Author Topic: 2012 Draft  (Read 22204 times)

mO

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Re: 2012 Draft
« Reply #900 on: July 13, 2012, 10:31:33 pm »
Sidd Finch?

JR

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Re: 2012 Draft
« Reply #901 on: July 14, 2012, 09:01:23 am »
ESPN story on Matt Harrington from a couple of years ago.

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/eticket/story?page=090423/harrington

Dave23

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Re: 2012 Draft
« Reply #902 on: July 14, 2012, 12:37:21 pm »
It was definitely Harrington...

nobull

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Re: 2012 Draft
« Reply #903 on: July 14, 2012, 12:50:48 pm »
Harrington is probably the guy, although it seems like there was another one, too.  One with a funky name.  Maybe earlier.
Matt Harrington?  I've been trying to think of it too.  Believe he was drafted and signed by the Rockies for much less than what he could have signed for the first time he was drafted.  Never did anything.
You men Costco Boy

DelMarFan

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Re: 2012 Draft
« Reply #904 on: July 16, 2012, 11:59:38 am »
Yeah, it was Harrington.  Thanks for the link.

JR

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Re: 2012 Draft
« Reply #905 on: August 02, 2012, 11:40:37 pm »
The guy who writes Ask BA just sent me an email about the MLB scholarship program for anyone interested . . .

Most teams (it varies) will match what a player is going to get from a school. So if a high school player has been offered a three-quarter scholarship, the team will give him eight semesters at what would cover 75 percent of his expenses. If a college junior has a half scholarship, the team will give him two semesters at 50 percent of cost.

It's not a scholarship, per se. There are no adjustments if tuition goes up (it always does) before a player uses it. And the IRS looks at it as taxable income, so the player has to pay taxes on it if he uses it. He also may find out that the school that wanted him for baseball may not want him if he's only a student.

Very, very few high school signees use this program to get a college degree. I think it looks good on paper, but it's not as good as it looks.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2012, 11:48:24 pm by JR »

Cactus

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Re: 2012 Draft
« Reply #906 on: October 17, 2012, 03:19:44 pm »
Cubs Den analyzes whether the Cubs should take a pitcher or a position player with their #2 pick in the 2013 draft

Should Cubs really be locked into a college pitcher with first pick?


Quote
The results of our poll thus far are overwhelming.  87% of our readers want the Cubs to take a college pitcher, whether it be Mark Appel, Ryan Stanek, or Sean Manaea.

It seems like a no-brainer.  The Cubs need pitching.  Soon.  They need impact talent on the mound in their organization.  I'm one of those guys on board with taking a pitcher with their first round pick (#2 overall).

John Arguello's conclusion:
Quote
But it seems to me that if someone like outfielders Austin Wilson, Austin Meadows, and/or Clint Frazier (pictured above) show greater long term impact potential, the Cubs will have to think long and hard about selecting them rather than stretching to fill a need.  Though it is the strength of the draft, there really are no "can't miss" prospects among the starting pitchers.  The Cubs will have to decide if there is a potential Justin Verlander (who was no sure thing) in the group.  If not, maybe they'll have to look to fill their starting pitching needs elsewhere and just take the best available player.

http://www.chicagonow.com/cubs-den/2012/10/should-cubs-really-be-locked-into-a-college-pitcher-with-first-pick/

StrikeZone

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Re: 2012 Draft
« Reply #907 on: October 18, 2012, 03:53:43 pm »
Whomever they think will have the greater impact at the Major League level is the player they should take.  If that's a pitcher, great.  If it's an outfielder or a catcher or a shortstop, super.

Just get a freaking superstar.

craig

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Re: 2012 Draft
« Reply #908 on: October 19, 2012, 08:09:45 am »
John Arguello notices what's obvious:  college pitchers have a high disappointment rate.  Lots of guys look good in college and throw very hard, while pitching once a week.  But will his arm have the same velocity and life years later after grinding out starts every 5th day for 5 or 8  years?  Not usually.

Suppose you scout and evaluate well, and are able to identify both a pitcher and a hitter who really do prove to be excellent players.  The hitter is much more likely to remain excellent for a long time than is the pitcher.  You can identify a really good pitcher, but will he still have the physical qualities to remain really good 4, 6, 8, and 10 years out?  At #2, all ties go to the players, IMO. 

There's a flip side, though.  College pitchers are much easier to scout.  Even if the excellent pitcher doesn't remain good for especially long, getting a good pitcher for a few years is better than mis-projecting a player who never ends up being very good. 

The A's selected Mark Mulder ahead of Corey Patterson.  After three excellent big-league seasons Mulder's great arm was wearing out; by year 4 his arm was just average, and by year six he was totally cooked.  As excellent as Mulder was for three seasons, an excellent player for ten years would have been preferable.  But three excellent years of Mulder was still a lot better than the 2-3 months of excellence that the Cubs got out of Corey Patterson. 
« Last Edit: October 19, 2012, 08:11:44 am by craig »

CurtOne

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Re: 2012 Draft
« Reply #909 on: October 19, 2012, 11:13:34 am »
Craig, I doubt many big college programs have schedules that have pitchers throwing once a week.  Most colleges have 5 and 6 games schedules per week, sometimes with multiple doubleheaders if they end up with crappy weather.  I'd guess most starting pitchers throw at least 1.75 times a week, and relievers 3 or 4 times.

Cactus

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Re: 2012 Draft
« Reply #910 on: October 19, 2012, 11:53:06 am »
Craig, I doubt many big college programs have schedules that have pitchers throwing once a week.  Most colleges have 5 and 6 games schedules per week,
That may be true during the non-conference portion of their schedule.  The PAC-12, if it is typical, plays conference games Friday through Sunday.

craig

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Re: 2012 Draft
« Reply #911 on: October 19, 2012, 12:34:56 pm »
Yup.  They don't refer to a college ace as the "Friday night starter" for no reason. 

dallen7908

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Re: 2012 Draft
« Reply #912 on: October 19, 2012, 04:09:20 pm »
Many top programs carry 35 players (sharing 11.3 scholarships or something like that).  Of those 35, there are ~20 willing candidates to serve as starting pitchers. In the past Southern schools played ~4 games per week while Northern Schools played 5-5.5 games per week. Within the past five years, the NCAA pushed back the start of the season from early February to mid-February to help out the Northern schools. Northern Schools need deeper pitching staffs and occasionally lose to weak teams when trotting out their 5th or 6th starters.  These losses kill their RPIs and lessen their chances of playing the final 64. Yes,starters usually only pitch once per week.

Playtwo

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Re: 2012 Draft
« Reply #913 on: October 29, 2012, 06:05:23 pm »

Ray

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Re: 2012 Draft
« Reply #914 on: October 29, 2012, 06:38:26 pm »
This guy could be decent:

http://www.pointstreak.com/baseball/player.html?playerid=318511


Manaea is a guy that's peaked my interest, but he doesn't seem like a top of the rotation starter.  Not to mention, that while he touches 96, he pitches at 91-92...if he were to lose a tick or 2 of his fastball, he'd be throwing it up there at 89-90 and it's hard to be successful doing that.  From what i've read his secondary pitches need work, too.  That's assuming he hasn't had a jump in velocity, or some other such improvement.