Author Topic: Cubs History  (Read 27810 times)

Cactus

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Re: Cubs History
« Reply #30 on: April 05, 2011, 12:30:31 am »
April 5, 1997 - Just one day after the stadium's first game, Turner Field holds its first slumber party. Rain showers force Saturday night's Cubs-Braves game to be suspended in the seventh inning late Saturday night, but because of the change to daylight savings time and a day game on Sunday, several players decide to spend the night in the clubhouse at the brand-new stadium. The Braves win the completion of the suspended game, 11-5, and then win the regularly scheduled game, 4-0.

FITS

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Re: Cubs History
« Reply #31 on: April 05, 2011, 07:29:46 am »
Trivia Answer (better late then never)


First CUBS game at Weeghman/Wrigley was April 20, 1916, a 7-6 victory over the Cincinnati Reds in 11 innings.

Jes Beard

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Re: Cubs History
« Reply #32 on: April 05, 2011, 08:02:54 am »
Although I'm not excusing Anson, he was just reflecting the tempo of his time.  There were other instances of managers refusing to play against blacks, but he was the Babe Ruth of his day, so his refusal carried more weight. 

No doubt there was plenty of racism to go around.  At the time of the Civil War, many norther states had laws on the books which did at least one of the following: 1) Prohibited blacks from living in any incorporated area in the state; 2) Made it illegal to employ blacks in any incorporated area in the state; or 3) Prohibited blacks from being present after dark in any incorporated are in the state.  Indiana (my home state) had all three.  Some states made it illegal for black to move into the state. 

None of that changes the fact that Anson led the resistance to blacks playing in organized baseball at the time, and without him leading the resistance, and refusing to allow his team to take the field if blacks played, the normal forces of market competition would likely have resulted in integration of baseball in the 1800's.  Not smoothly or in any friendly or embracing manner, but it likely would have happened.

And, even if it would not have happened, Anson's position on the issue still leaves him a POS.

Tuffy

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Re: Cubs History
« Reply #33 on: April 05, 2011, 09:30:41 am »
Jes, if you think integration would have happened in the late 1800s if not for Anson, why didn't it happen in the first decades of the 20th century, when Anson was out of baseball?

There was an explosion of talent on Negro teams, particularly in Chicago and New York, in those years.  Weren't there other racists preventing integration by then?

Clarkaddison

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Re: Cubs History
« Reply #34 on: April 05, 2011, 11:04:49 am »
Read Anson's ghost written biography, available free through Amazon ebooks.  He comes off as an arrogant, self centered individual.  There is no mention of the color line in the book, but he had an acrimonious breakup with the Colts at the end of his career, and has lots to say about Spaulding and Chicago NL management.  (They weren't the Cubs before 1902).

Jes Beard

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Re: Cubs History
« Reply #35 on: April 05, 2011, 12:08:09 pm »
Tuffy, integration WAS happening early in the 20th century.  The military and all federal offices were integrated before Woodrow Wilson was elected president.

He RE-segregated them.  Before Wilson blacks and whites worked side by side in government offices and in the military.  Wilson ended that.  The Klan had also faded to near nothingness by then.  Birth of a Nation, which was essentially an ode to the Klan, then came out, and Wilson very strongly praised the movie, which he claimed was not only important for everyone to see, but historically accurate.

He was the President.  And he was a former university professor and the president of Princeton University.  Folks accepted what he said about the movie, flocked to it and absorbed its racist message, one Wilson himself championed.

The Negro leagues did not begin to form until nearly 1920, and by then the Klan had enjoyed the greatest growth and popularity it has ever seen, at least in part because it was not only accepted by the establishment (Wilson), but virtually blessed as a wonderful organization with great ideals.

Before the Negro leagues, black players were able to barnstorm with white players, but that was about it.

FITS

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Re: Cubs History
« Reply #36 on: April 05, 2011, 12:16:00 pm »
Today's Trivia


The 1977 Cubs donned black armbands on the sleeves of their jerseys in memory of whom?



brs2

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Re: Cubs History
« Reply #37 on: April 05, 2011, 12:20:34 pm »
To honor PK Wrigley.

Tuffy

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Re: Cubs History
« Reply #38 on: April 05, 2011, 01:11:34 pm »
Jes, I hadn't known that about Woodrow Wilson.  Interestnig stuff.

Cactus

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Re: Cubs History
« Reply #39 on: April 05, 2011, 01:50:58 pm »
Jackie Robinson

FITS

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Re: Cubs History
« Reply #40 on: April 05, 2011, 03:23:56 pm »
brs2 is correct.  The armbands were worn in memory of Philip K. Wrigley.

FITS

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Re: Cubs History
« Reply #41 on: April 05, 2011, 03:24:22 pm »
Trivia Leaderboard


1. brs2 - 1

FITS

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Re: Cubs History
« Reply #42 on: April 06, 2011, 11:19:56 am »

Today's Trivia


In what year was the ivy planted on the outfield walls at Wrigley Field?

Clarkaddison

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Re: Cubs History
« Reply #43 on: April 06, 2011, 12:04:50 pm »
1937

Cactus

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Re: Cubs History
« Reply #44 on: April 06, 2011, 01:13:59 pm »
ClarkAddison is correct but to get a bit technical

The ivy grows on the back of the warning track and climbs the brick wall.